TKR Remote Viewing

Remote Viewing! => Psi/RV General, Media, Research, Miscellany => Topic started by: rvguy on February 21, 2007, 09:52:55 PM

Title: The old ARV article in Wall Street Journal
Post by: rvguy on February 21, 2007, 09:52:55 PM
Hello all.  I was looking for something my library's archive this evening and I found a copy of the ancient article about Targ and Putoff making money in the futures market using ARV.  This article was published in October 1984 courtesy of the Wall Street Journal. While it is text only, I'm sure many of you in RVland have heard of it and would like to read it.  Well, now is your chance.  Enjoy.

RVguy



Did Psychic Powers Give Firm a Killing In the Silver Market? --- And Did Greed Ruin It All? Californians Switch Over To an Extrasensory Switch

By Erik Larson. Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y.: Oct 22, 1984. pg. 1


Abstract (Document Summary)

This was a test, and a clever one, of the ancient network of oracles. Croesus sent messengers to ask each oracle to describe what the king was up to at that particular moment. Only the oracle at Delphi called it right. No slouch when it came to rewards, Croesus slaughtered a few thousand sacrificial beasts, then dropped off a little something extra: 117 gold ingots and a solid gold lion weighing 570 pounds.

Delphi Associates of San Mateo would settle for the gold lion. Delphi is a struggling three-man partnership formed to cash in on the fruits of its founders' psychic research. "This is not just an amusing exercise," says Anthony R. White, a Stanford University M.B.A., art investor and manager of a family fortune. The research heavyweight is Russell Targ, a physicist who built sophisticated lasers for GTE Sylvania Inc. until 1972, then spent the next 10 years doing hush-hush, still "classified," psychic research for the federal government at SRI International, the sober California think tank. "We didn't invent psychic functioning," he says. "We thought we understood it enough to go into the market."

Delphi has tried using its psychic talents to make a killing in silver futures, to develop ESP games for Atari Inc., to search for oil, and, in its most ambitious effort yet, to create a psychic switch that can be turned on by mental energy. The logic of going into business is clear, at least to Keith Harary, the third partner, who worked with Mr. Targ at SRI. "Somebody has to get his feet wet," he says. "Somebody has to get out there and start doing it."

Full Text (1351 words)
Copyright Dow Jones & Company Inc Oct 22, 1984

SAN MATEO, Calif. -- Clairvoyance has always had its rewards. In 550 B.C., King Croesus of Lydia sliced up a tortoise and a lamb and mashed them together in a brass pot. This was not dinner.

This was a test, and a clever one, of the ancient network of oracles. Croesus sent messengers to ask each oracle to describe what the king was up to at that particular moment. Only the oracle at Delphi called it right. No slouch when it came to rewards, Croesus slaughtered a few thousand sacrificial beasts, then dropped off a little something extra: 117 gold ingots and a solid gold lion weighing 570 pounds.

Delphi Associates of San Mateo would settle for the gold lion. Delphi is a struggling three-man partnership formed to cash in on the fruits of its founders' psychic research. "This is not just an amusing exercise," says Anthony R. White, a Stanford University M.B.A., art investor and manager of a family fortune. The research heavyweight is Russell Targ, a physicist who built sophisticated lasers for GTE Sylvania Inc. until 1972, then spent the next 10 years doing hush-hush, still "classified," psychic research for the federal government at SRI International, the sober California think tank. "We didn't invent psychic functioning," he says. "We thought we understood it enough to go into the market."

Delphi has tried using its psychic talents to make a killing in silver futures, to develop ESP games for Atari Inc., to search for oil, and, in its most ambitious effort yet, to create a psychic switch that can be turned on by mental energy. The logic of going into business is clear, at least to Keith Harary, the third partner, who worked with Mr. Targ at SRI. "Somebody has to get his feet wet," he says. "Somebody has to get out there and start doing it."

None of the three looks anything like a carnival swami, least of all Mr. Targ. Dressed in maroon sweater, tweed jacket and khaki pants, he could be your basic Physics I professor. His graying hair stands out from his head as if charged with static electricity; thick glasses turn his eyes to chocolate orbs.

At SRI, where he worked for government agencies no one will identify, he concentrated on remote-viewing, the ability of one viewer to "see" what another person -- the "beacon" -- is looking at even though the beacon may be thousands of miles away, a talent the Russians are believed to be busily researching. He worked with subjects including Hella Hammid, a Los Angeles photographer, who says she had no problem finding a parking spot for a San Francisco interview because she knew ahead of time just where it would be. "It has also happened," she notes, "that I have seen these spots and I have gotten there just as someone else has pulled in. Very maddening."

By 1982, Mr. Targ says, "We'd shown unequivocally that people could describe distant locations as well as events that lie in the future." Unequivocally, that is, within the so-called "RV community" (as in remote viewing). The psychic field as a whole hasn't garnered much respect from the hard sciences.

Commercial success, say paranormal researchers, may be just what the field needs to be taken seriously. In fact, ever more technical research is being done, although institutions remain squeamish about their scientists who look into, uh, anomalies.

SRI continues its secret work. At Princeton University the engineering dean studies how the mind and machines may interact. So too does Dean Radin, a human-factors psychologist for a Bell Telephone Laboratories operation in Columbus, Ohio, who says some of his colleagues accuse him of "pursuing the work of the devil" -- yet Bell reviewed some of his work, done on the side, and allowed him to present it under the Bell imprimatur.

One of Delphi's first commercial ventures was its foray into the silver-futures market. Using the money put up by three investors, Delphi tried to forecast roughly how much silver prices would change between Thursday's closing and Monday's closing prices. In all of the first nine tries, Keith Harary, the most psychic partner, made correct predictions. Delphi only got into the market on seven of them, but the investors still made "in the middle six figures," and Delphi got a commission.

Alas, the power proved fickle. "Our major client suffered an attack of hubris and started pressing us for more predictions," says Mr. White. Delphi failed on the next two tries. Then, says Mr. White, "Our client got apoplectic." Too much strain on Mr. Harary? Or did the failure demonstrate that old shibboleth that psychic power won't work if used for greed or other evils? "It was a difficult blow for all of us," Mr. White says.

But Delphi is trying again, using a modified method and far smaller sums. Delphi's broker, John Rende, president of California Securities Corp. of Larkspur, Calif., says he was impressed by the early results, but he warns the technique won't be really useful until Delphi can say exactly how reliable it is.

Paul Kurtz, a philosophy professor and chairman of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal, skeptics all, says: "In order to say anything, they'd have to have several hundred, several thousand investments. It's a very small sample. My Aunt Martha could do better than that."

Nonetheless, Delphi has high hopes for another project, its psychic switch. The work at Princeton and Bell Labs, as well as work at Syracuse University, offers some evidence that people can indeed influence sensitive electronics. At Syracuse, Robert Morris, a senior research scientist, found that anxious people, by just being around a computer, seemed more likely to cause it to malfunction than did calm people. Test subjects never actually touched the machine. He warns that his findings are tentative.

Delphi has spent six months so far on its device. "We needed something that was terribly sensitive to a tiny amount of influence, and yet stable enough that it wouldn't constantly go off by itself," says Mr. White. The prototype is extremely stable, he says. "You can bang on the table, and it will not go off." He won't describe the device, saying: "I'm afraid the details are proprietary."

But Delphi contends the prototype has worked. "Keith turned it on from San Francisco," says Mr. Targ. "Twice," Mr. Harary, the other Delphi partner, says.

Delphi's big money earner has been a three-year licensing and consulting contract with Atari Inc., signed in March 1983, that gave Atari rights to any products Delphi produced. Delphi got $10,000 a month for its services, then got caught by Atari's troubles. (Local publications made great light of this, chortling that Delphi should have seen the trouble coming.)

In September, Delphi went to state court seeking a preliminary injunction that would force the Warner Communications Inc. unit to live up to the contract. "Otherwise," Mr. Targ states in a court declaration, "there is a very real and present danger that Delphi Associates will fail financially." Atari responded by rescinding the contract. And last week a judge refused to grant the injunction, so Delphi and its lawyers are trying to decide what further action to take.

All is not lost yet, however. Delphi draws revenue from a book, "The Mind Race," written by Messrs. Targ and Harary (and a paperback version is due out in the spring). Delphi is also trying to find a publisher for a novel about a teen-ager with psychic powers. It has quoted fees to help locate an airplane lost in British Columbia, to find gold in a Northwest gold property, and to look for oil and gas in Australia and the U.S.

In the meantime, the partners intend to continue their studies. "The existence of psychic functioning shows that there is something fundamentally incorrect about the prevailing view of how space and time are understood," Mr. Targ says.

What about other sorts of paranormal things, like ghosts? "What? The idea that dead people are walking around 'disincarnate'?" says Mr. Harary. "Gimme a break."

Credit: Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal





Title: Re: The old ARV article in Wall Street Journal
Post by: Banded_Krait on February 21, 2007, 11:09:00 PM
Quote
Alas, the power proved fickle. "Our major client suffered an attack of hubris and started pressing us for more predictions," says Mr. White. Delphi failed on the next two tries. Then, says Mr. White, "Our client got apoplectic." Too much strain on Mr. Harary? Or did the failure demonstrate that old shibboleth that psychic power won't work if used for greed or other evils? "It was a difficult blow for all of us," Mr. White says.


During his RV workshop at the Omega Institute last September, Russell Targ briefly discussed this venture.  He said that he thinks the reason it eventually failed was that the investors became too greedy and demanded that the viewers perform multiple sessions per week.  Thus, the viewers were not getting clear, unambiguous feedback from one session before beginning the next.

Targ also discussed the fact that he has recently undertaken some ARV ventures with Dr. Jeffry Mishlove and that they have made money.  Mishlove has discussed these activities on his blog:  

http://jeff.zaadz.com/blog/2006/2/financial_forecasting

(See the last sentence under the above post.)