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Author Topic: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course  (Read 8657 times)

Sal

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looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« on: July 12, 2009, 04:54:29 PM »
I would like to hear from your opinion on the Gerald O´Donnel RV method.
I have been through this method since 6 months ago and to be honest I could not have done a RV session even that I followed all the given instructions.
Maybe I took  the wrong method or I am doing something wrong.

Sal

LD

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2009, 05:25:49 PM »
Hi Sal,

Welcome to TKR!

I don't have any experience with Gerald O'Donnel's method. But I think one of the most important things in learning RV is to try lots of different things and find out what works best for you personally. What works great for one person might not work well at all for the next. I would say if it's not working for you, try something else for a while.

We had a live chat with Joe McMoneagle yesterday. He told us he thinks experimentation is one of the most important things; That it's the only way you'll be able to find out how your own mind works in regards to psi, because we're all unique individuals.

Best,
LD
Lawrence, TKR Admin

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Mycroft

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2009, 05:43:22 PM »
We had a live chat with Joe McMoneagle yesterday. He told us he thinks experimentation is one of the most important things; That it's the only way you'll be able to find out how your own mind works in regards to psi, because we're all unique individuals.

Whaa...?  :o

You mean that blood sacrifices to pagan idols are not necessary? ..now he tells me..


Mycroft
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Self Realization is one of the primary reasons we are here, please wake up. Mycroft

Banded_Krait

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2009, 12:51:41 AM »
Quote
I would like to hear from your opinion on the Gerald O´Donnel RV method.
I have been through this method since 6 months ago and to be honest I could not have done a RV session even that I followed all the given instructions.
Maybe I took  the wrong method or I am doing something wrong.

Sal,

I agree 100% with what Larry (LD) said.  If Gerald O' Donnel's method is not working for you, don't be afraid to try something else.

In my personal opinion, far too many of these RV "gurus" overcomplicate things.  My personal experience is that you don't need some complicated method to experience remote viewing.  I recently completed a document for some friends in which I detailed my method for remote viewing.  I will post that here.  But first I want to recommend that you view the following video on the British Google Video site.  It shows a woman with no remote viewing experience having an outstanding session on her very first try.  What I love about this video is that it demonstrates how simple and straightforward the process really is:  no weird rituals required.  (Note: ignore the first 15 seconds of this video, which shows an outspoken skeptic insisting that psi does not exist.  Of course, the next 10 minutes of the video vividly demonstrates that this skeptic is completely wrong.)

http://tinyurl.com/642dla

Now, here are my instructions for experiencing remote viewing:

Some Tips on Beginning a Remote Viewing Training Program

-------------------------------------------
Choice of Targets
-------------------------------------------

A.  Real, three-dimensional targets
1.   Small, “interesting” objects – Give an assistant $10 and send him to a dollar store with instructions to buy 5 or 6 small, interesting objects.  By interesting I mean an interesting shape, or color, or texture.  Try to choose objects which are a little out of the ordinary.  Make sure the objects are completely different from each other in shape, color, texture, weight, etc.   Have your assistant place each object in its own sealed container.  Thick, brown paper grocery bags make good containers.  Now, when it comes time to conduct a practice session, either you or your assistant can choose one of the containers.  Perform your session, and when you are done, open the container and retrieve the target object.  Examine it very closely.  Look at it from every angle, smell it, handle it very carefully and intently.  You want to “experience” the object very deeply, and compare your feedback experience with the mental impressions you had during your session.  Review your session notes and any drawings you made.  Pay close attention to those features you did well on, and try to figure out what aspects gave you the most trouble.  You want to make each feedback session a learning experience.
2.   Geographical locations – If you have a willing assistant or team to help you, you can duplicate Targ and Puthoff’s ground-breaking RV research protocol.  You can send an outbound “agent” to a location which is unknown to you.  Have that person linger at the site for about a half hour while you conduct your session.  Try to perceive the agent’s surroundings.  Try to receive both visual and tactile perceptions.  You may even receive auditory impressions (like the woman, Tessa, in the very first video, above).  After your session is over, you want to go to the target location yourself for feedback.  As always, you want to make receiving feedback a learning experience.  Try to experience the target location very deeply, and compare the actual experience of being there with the perceptions you received while conducting your session.

B.  Two-dimensional targets
1.   Drawings made by another person – If you have an assistant to help you, you can try to duplicate the protocol the Sinclairs used.  You can sequester yourself in a room separate from the “agent.”  The agent then makes a simple, pen-and-ink target drawing of some object which he chooses at random.  You try to perceive the object and draw it yourself and/or make notes about your impressions.  When you are done you meet the agent and examine his drawing for feedback.
2.   Children’s picture stickers – Have an assistant go to a greeting card store, or a toy store, and purchase several dozen packets of children’s picture stickers.  Also buy some blank index cards.  Try to get a very good assortment of stickers so that they are distinct from each other.  When it is time to conduct a session, have your assistant select one sticker at random and stick it on a blank index card. 
3.   Pictures in magazines – Yet another person who played an interesting role in the U.S. government’s RV research program is an individual named Dale Graff.   Graff was interested in both remote viewing and psi dreaming – that is, experiencing ESP during dreams.  One method he used for selecting targets was as follows.  He would buy a slick, glossy magazine of a type which could be guaranteed to have lots of photographs in it (either editorial photographs or lots of slick advertisements).  He would not open the magazine, but simply would slide a bookmark or ruler into the magazine at random.  He would then task himself to perceive the photograph on the right-hand page.  This method worked most of the time, but occasionally would bomb because there wouldn’t be any photographs on the desired page.
4.   Other photographs – You could have an assistant cut target photographs from a magazine.  Or, you could buy a stock photograph collection on CD (displayable on the computer) and have an assistant select one for the target.  Or, as I describe above, you can learn to use the Dojo Psi Web site, which has a database of over 1,500 photographs in its collection.
5.   Clip art – Many vendors of computer software offer collections of “clip-art” for sale.  Many of these are quite extensive, containing 25,000; 50,000; or even 100,000 objects in the collection.  At some bookstores you can even find books of clip-art for sale.
6.   Photo-sharing Web sites.  If you go to Wikipedia and search on “photo-sharing Web sites,” you will be presented with a list of over 20 Web sites in which people can upload photographs they take.  Basically, these Web sites function as online photograph albums.  What makes them valuable for remote viewing is that on many of the sites, many people who upload their photographs do not “lock” them and this makes them available for other people to download to their computer.  In this way, you can build a collection of target photographs.  Just be careful not to violate any of the photographers' copyrights.    Never publish them in other publications without the specific permission of the copyright holder.

-------------------------------------------
Guidelines for Viewing
-------------------------------------------
In the next section, I will give very detailed instructions for performing a remote viewing session.  But first, I wanted to give some general guidelines which you should always keep in mind as you undertake a remote viewing session:
1.   Maintain a playful attitude.   Too many adults don’t have any fun in their lives.  They are overwhelmed by work, family, or home responsibilities.  Try to approach remote viewing as a recreational hobby, as something fun to enjoy.  It is my personal opinion that remote viewing is a quirky side effect of the basic physics of the universe.  This allows me to think of remote viewing as one of the fascinating basic phenomena of nature.  This allows me to approach it with a sense of wonder, of joy.  Every time I have a good remote viewing session I come away thinking that nature has let me in on one of its special little secrets.
2.   Approach remote viewing with a matter-of-fact attitude.  That is, try not to take it too seriously or too lightly.  Performance anxiety will kill a remote viewing session quicker than just about anything.  Always remind yourself that hundreds upon hundreds—if not thousands—of people before you have experienced remote viewing.  Indeed, physicist Russell Targ has stated that in over 30 years of studying remote viewing in the laboratory nearly everyone he has ever tested has shown some remote viewing ability.  You would be a very exceptional person indeed if you proved to have no remote viewing ability whatsoever.  On the other hand, once you experience remote viewing, don’t let yourself get a swelled head about it.  Don’t think of yourself as some sort of psychic superstar.  Remote viewing is so quirky, so variable, that you are bound to have a bad session every once in a while.
3.   Describe, don’t analyze.  This should be the fundamental mantra of all remote viewers.  In their pioneering RV research, Targ and Puthoff found out that remote viewing seems to be a function of the right hemisphere of the brain.  When you perform a remote viewing session, just describe the shapes, colors, size, textures, tactile impressions, smells, and emotions which come through.  Do not try to name the target.  When you try to name the target, you are activating the left hemisphere of the brain.  This can kill your remote viewing session.  It is only after I am done my session, when I am no longer getting fresh perceptions of the target, that I try to name the target.  Usually I will try to list some alternative possibilities.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
My Technique for Performing a Remote Viewing Session
---------------------------------------------------------------------

I learned how to experience remote viewing by reading several books by Russell Targ (notably, his 1984 book, Mind Race) and Chapter 21 in the book Mental Radio by Upton Sinclair.  Over time, I customized my technique to suit myself and my personality.

Here is the main principle:  I take several steps which put me in what I refer to as the meditative state of consciousness.  This is the state of consciousness experienced by people who meditate.  In this state of consciousness the right hemisphere of the brain takes over.  If a neural physiologist put electrodes on my scalp and took an EEG, he would probably see predominantly alpha brainwaves.  This is compared to what I refer to as our normal, everyday, walking-around state of consciousness, in which the left hemisphere is dominant.  In that state of consciousness beta brainwaves predominate.

Here is a summary of my technique for experiencing remote viewing:

1.   Go to a quiet, slightly-darkened room which is free from distractions.
2.   Physically relax for five minutes.
3.   Clear your mind and slow your breathing for five minutes.
4.   After this 10-minute “cool down” period, give your subconscious the command, “Show me the target.”

That’s it.  If you are lucky and are destined to have a good session that day, for the next 20 minutes to a half-hour you will receive perceptions of the target.  Note:  I use the word perceptions, rather than visions.  Much of what you receive is visual in nature, but remote viewers can receive tactile, auditory, or olfactory perceptions of the target as well.  Just jot down on paper the perceptions you are receiving.  Make drawings if you wish.  I often complete my session and then make my notes, rather than pausing to take my notes during my session.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Detailed Instructions for Performing a Remote Viewing Session
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Choice of Environment

The preferred environment is what I described in my summary:  you want a quiet, slightly-darkened room which is free from distractions.  You want an environment which is free from auditory and visual distractions because the perceptions you receive while remote viewing are often very subtle, very slight.  They are easy to miss if you are in an environment with loud noises or highly exciting visual stimuli.

I live in a house which is alongside a very busy two-lane state road.  As a consequence, I get a lot of traffic noise in my home.  Therefore, I often use foam earplugs to help block out the noise.

I often perform my remote viewing sessions in a ground floor “powder room”; that is, a small bathroom with just a toilet and a sink.  I drag a small, resin deck chair in there, close the door and turn out the light.  I then perform my remote viewing session for about a half an hour, emerge from the room, and then make my notes and drawings.

I prefer conducting my remote viewing sessions while sitting down.  I have not had good luck trying to perform remote viewing sessions while lying down, such as in bed.  On the several times I tried, I ended up falling asleep.  However, I note that Mary Craig Sinclair states in the book, Mental Radio, that she performed her “telepathy” sessions while lying down.  Similarly, many of the remote viewers studied at the Stanford Research Institute also lay down.  It is a matter of personal preference.

Recently I bought a fairly expensive chaise lounge of the type one gets for the deck or poolside.  I set that up in my  finished basement and have tried several remote viewing sessions using that.  While sitting in this chaise lounge one is in a position which is half-sitting, half-lying down.  I have had good luck using this so far.

You will just have to experiment with what environment works best for you.  I do want to mention that I was able to conduct remote viewing sessions in the workshops I attended with far less optimal environments.  In these workshops I was surrounded by up to 30 other people.  The rooms always remained well-lit.  During the remote viewing exercises, the participants generally refrained from talking, but you could always hear people shifting in their chairs, clearing their throats, etc.  I often did as well in these exercises as I do in my preferred environment at home, so that tells you that an optimal environment is not necessary to experience good remote viewing sessions.


Physically Relax for Five Minutes

As I stated above, the key idea in remote viewing is that you want to change your state of consciousness to what I call the meditative state.  One of the most important steps towards putting your mind in this state is physical relaxation.  I always perform a set of progressive relaxation techniques to start my remote viewing sessions.  Basically, I just alternately tense and then relax as many of my muscles as possible, starting with my toes and working my way up my body.  As I relax each muscle in turn, I concentrate how good it feels, and how it helps dispense with any residual tension in my body.  Also, by concentrating on these physical sensations, I start the process of blanking out my mind from any residual thoughts I may have been wrestling with right before beginning the session.


Blank Out Your Mind and Slow Your Breathing for Five Minutes

After I am nice and relaxed, I then spend about five minutes trying to clear my mind of any remaining residual thoughts.  Usually, the act of physically relaxing has already gotten me 80% there.  Now, I just try to gradually slow my breathing a little bit.  There are a number of disciplines such as yoga which make a big deal about the correct way to breathe, but you really don’t have to go that far in remote viewing.  I have just found that if I concentrate on my breathing, the very act of making myself aware of it seems to slow it down a little bit.  I may go as far as saying “In” to myself as I breathe in, and “Out” as I breathe out.  You really don’t have to do anything drastic, and you want to slow it down just a little.  You definitely do not want to hold your breath.  Just breathe very gently and a little deeper and slower than usual.

Concentrating on your breathing will help clear your mind.  Having a clear mind is an absolute requirement for remote viewing, and it is one of the hardest states to achieve.  The Zen Buddhists talk of us humans having undisciplined “monkey minds” which continuously jump from one thought to another.


After the 10-minute Cool Down Period, Give Your Subconscious the Command, “Show me the target.”

A number of  books I have read make a big deal about trying to imagine some kind of projection screen on which you want the information to appear.  Indeed, in my first dozen or so remote viewing sessions I imagined what I refer to as a “gray board” (instead of a blackboard or whiteboard) on which I wanted my visions to appear.

In his workshop, Joe McMoneagle told us of the technique he uses.  He imagines that there is a “dark sphere” in the center of his skull, something like a black hollow golf ball.  Joe then imagines this sphere starting to expand, and as it expands it becomes filled with the information flowing in from the target.

After a while, I found that I didn’t have to get too fancy in this area, either.  Simply by saying, “Show me the target,” – presumably to my subconscious – is all that is necessary.  However, if you find that any of these little psychological tricks help you to perceive the target, do not hesitate to use them.


Perceive the Target for the Next 20 – 30 Minutes

One of the most important things I can teach you is what kind of perceptions to expect during remote viewing.  The most important thing is do not expect very clear, vivid, visual images like a photograph or a video.  Instead, most often remote viewing perceptions are like memories; indeed, retired U.S. Army major Paul H. Smith, who was one of the government’s remote viewers, states:

True remote viewing signals are often vague, fuzzy, indistinct – I like to say, “Like half-remembered memories that we nevertheless know are memories you never had before.”  (see: http://irva.org/SimpleRemoteViewing.html )

Dean Radin presents his theory as to why this might be so on page 266 of his book, Entangled Minds.  I am not going to discuss his theory in any depth, here, other than to say I believe he may be on to something, because I experience remote viewing perceptions in precisely this way.

I do not believe the visual system is activated during remote viewing.  I do not believe the optic nerve is stimulated.  Instead I believe the mind receives the “signal” (I put this in quotes because it is definitely not an electromagnetic signal) from the event, and this evokes a memory of a similar event.

Much of the time, the perceptions I get from remote viewing are like coarse-grained black-and-white photographs which dart across my “mind’s eye” very rapidly.  I refer to them as “flickers”.  I was relieved to read that both Mary Craig Sinclair (see page 107 in Mental Radio) and Hella Hammid (see page 213 in Mind Race) often experienced remote viewing perceptions in this way, as well.

Here is an exercise you can perform which will approximate what a remote viewing “image” looks like.  Sometime right after you first wake up in the morning, but before you get up, try this exercise.  Keep your eyes closed.  You need the room to be very dark.  Now, try to visualize a color—say, a deep blue.  What should happen is that you “sort of see it, but sort of don’t” both at the same time.  You are perceiving the color strictly by memory.  This is precisely how I “see” most remote viewing images.  Performing exercises of this type can evoke a kind of frustration, and I often feel this kind of frustration when I do a remote viewing session.  The human mind is a pattern-matching engine.  It wants to be certain of things.  It is used to getting very strong, reliable signals from our direct sensory inputs—from sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell.  But all of that is taken away during remote viewing, and everything happens second-hand through the memory.

The remote viewer’s inner psyche can readily interfere with the remote viewing process.  Because the signals are “bubbling up” through the subconscious, deep-seated fears, anxieties, prejudices, conditioning, etc., can readily interfere with the process.  This is why it is so important to blank out the mind and to try to keep it blank during the session.

As I stated in my guidelines, above, describe but don’t analyze.  Note the size, shape, colors, and texture of the target.  Try not to name it during your active session.  Ingo Swann, the New York psychic who was the first remote viewing subject in Targ and Puthoff’s research, named the phenomenon of having analysis interfere with the remote viewing process as analytical overlay, which he abbreviated as “AOL”.  During a remote viewing session, if the urge to name the target became too strong and threatened the success of the session, he would write down the name in a column on his notepaper which he had labeled as “AOL”.

If you perform your remote viewing session at a desk, you can make your notes and drawings as you perform your session.  I often perform my session first and then make my notes afterward.  I feel that this method allows me to really concentrate on the mental images and other perceptions as they come in.  However, I have made my notes and drawings while performing the session in the various workshops I have attended, with no apparent decline in results.  Once again, it is a matter of personal preference.


Make Sure to Get Feedback

Especially for the beginning remote viewer, experiencing feedback is an extremely important part of the process.  Make sure you examine the target object very closely.  If it is a visual target, such as a photograph or drawing, study it very intently.  Meditate on it; try to experience it very deeply.  If it is a 3-dimensional object or a physical location, try to get as many tactile, auditory, and olfactory sensations from it as possible.  Compare the actual sensory impressions you are getting with the perceptions you received while remote viewing.  In this way you will make each remote viewing session a learning experience.

==============

Good luck, Sal.  Keep us posted as to your progress.

Those who say it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it -- Chinese Proverb

Marv

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2009, 01:21:35 PM »
BRAVO BANDED KRAIT

What a great post!  :D
Marv, TKR Admin


http://www.thehomemadeviewer.com


Ten Thousand Roads (aka "TKR") Remote Viewing and Dowsing Project
Project Home: http://www.dojopsi.info/tenthousandroads/
RVwebForum: http://www.dojopsi.info/forum/
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Remote Viewing Library: http://www.dojopsi.info/
Remote Viewing Protocol! http://tinyurl.com/remote-viewing-protocol
RV Email Group: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/remote-viewing/

Gene

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2009, 09:02:57 PM »
Let me second what Marv said Banded Krait. That was a really nice well thought out answer that clearly took a lot of thought.

Thank you!
Gene
Gene, TKR Admin


Ten Thousand Roads (aka "TKR") Remote Viewing and Dowsing Project
Project Home: http://www.dojopsi.info/tenthousandroads/
RVwebForum: http://www.dojopsi.info/forum/
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sal

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2009, 11:16:35 PM »
Well,  I´m really without words.
I really want to thank you all for the feedback, but specially to Banded_Krait. I think many will agree that this has been a great post with a lot of effort.

This reply shows the difference between a good man and a great man.

And, of course I will practice all of your recomendations and of course I will be looking forward for all of Banded_Krait posts.
Thank you again.

Sal

PJ

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2009, 03:38:17 AM »
BK can we or you put that somewhere we can link to it on the left side?
Palyne, TKR Admin

If you love it enough, anything will talk with you. -- George Washington Carver

"A rose by any other name" would probably be "thorn-bearing assault vegetation."

It's hard to make predictions, especially about the future. -- Yogi Berra

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LD

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2009, 07:12:06 AM »
Yeah, great post Krait. We should have that somewhere easy to get to for others.
Lawrence, TKR Admin

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Remote Viewing Library: http://www.dojopsi.info/
Remote Viewing Protocol! http://tinyurl.com/remote-viewing-protocol
RV Email Group: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/remote-viewing/

edb

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Re: looking for opinions on a RV Training Course
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2009, 01:17:36 PM »
Banded_Krait,

Great post!  It's helping me get viewing again.

Maybe your post can be a "sticky" at the top of "Help + New-to-RV Questions"?
Now -- at this instant -- what do I need to know and do to achieve the best outcome for all involved.

 


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* TEN THOUSAND ROADS REMOTE VIEWING AND DOWSING PROJECT

Since its opening in 2003, the TKR Project has created and sponsored online opportunities for Remote Viewers and Dowsers. We provide free information, and community for all viewers (of all psychic methods, backgrounds, experience, and perspectives on psi), and an array of software utilities and projects offering real-time viewing within an appropriate RV protocol.

The Ten Thousand Roads (aka TKR) project is independently managed and webmastered by a diverse collection of viewers from around the "online RV field". All viewers from all paths are welcome. Everyone has an opinion and don't think any you see represent TKR (even if volunteer staff, who are viewers too, say it) or the RV-subject or the RV-field: for every viewer with one viewpoint, there are many with different perspectives too. If you don't see yours represented, step up and add it!

Feel welcome to excerpt text or screenshots to communicate about the project or RV, and we always appreciate links back to us! Try this link:
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* Quotable Quotes

This clearly indicated that belief and disbelief played some kind of psychological role regarding positive and negative manifestations of ESP. [ . . . ] That the basis for rejecting and debunking ESP might not reside in logic and reason, but in the fact that disbelievers were dysfunctional regarding it, came as something of a bombshell.
-- Ingo Swann
If you [...] don't speak up and shout down the skeptics, then it's YOUR nascent superpowers that are quailing before their ridiculous stupidities. [...] The WorldWide Web is yours, you know. Not theirs.
-- Ingo Swann
In other words, all of us are more the same than we are different. That we give overwhelming attention to our perceived differences gives rise to much of the human drama.
-- Ingo Swann
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