The Philosopher's Stone / ORME David Hudson

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PJ:
After reading a ton more info -- it's just that my pet interests are 'new technology' and 'alternative health approaches' -- it seems to be rather like this:

David Hudson, a very wealthy farmer in AZ, ended up spending many years and millions in a process that started as simple chemistry for agricultural issues, led to very advanced chemistry for rare platinums, which led to such unusual results it sort of overlapped with zero-point energy stuff.

Because in the end of the process whatever it was, was no longer a heavy metal--it defied normal science expectations in several ways, including an overlap with superconducting--at the end-point there was nothing that should have been toxic about it if ingested. It correlated to lots of writings found related to ancient egypt and the ancient jews, suggesting it might in fact be the whatever it was that priests ingested that was considered part of god.

This in turn led to a great deal of philosophy that seriously verged into the whole Cure-All for health as well as the Evolves-All for spirit lol.  Illegally (of course), very unofficial trials with a few on-death's-bed patients who gave their permission began, and once in awhile it would not save them--usually for some mitigating factor they figured out--but far more often it did, from things allegedly impossible to cure and sometimes people who had at the most weeks and at the least hours to live.

Given to healthy people it seemed to cause what some would call 'evolution', with a gradual development of the Siddhis (including psi) and changes in metabolism and many other things, all for the positive yet able to be overdone (making a person hypersensitive).

Hudson applied for 11 patents, both in the US and worldwide.  Shortly before granting he's contacted and told that it is essentially related to superconducting and so anything related to superconducting has to go through a review by the Dept of Defense.  He said the DoD wanted him to give them the tech and he refused.  He said they told him if he could prove the 'white powder of gold' he was referring to was real, that they might grant it.  So he created some and gave it to them (I assume they wanted to analyze it).  Then they said that they would only grant patent if he then proved he could turn it back into gold again.  He said he'd spent $540,000 on the patent process, was running out of money at that point, realized that patenting it worldwide even if passed did little but provide the information to lots of people, and he wouldn't have the money to sue to maintain the patents, and he didn't believe DoD would ever really allow it, so he pulled all of them.  His attorney told him nobody else could ever get a patent that applied to him since he'd been turned down.  So he said he was just offering the info free.  He said earlier that he didn't want to patent it but was told by a tech associate that if he didn't, someone else would, and despite his working with it daily for years he then wouldn't be allowed to 'go forth' about it. So he attempted the patent just to prevent someone else doing so.

Meanwhile back at the ranch he had spent so much money in his near obsession to understand this, which only drew him deeper every time, and to understand how it could be that this could be gotten from the soil in Arizona (ancient volcano apparently), that he was out of money. But he had all the equipment and confirmation and materials, and so he was ready to begin manufacturing the stuff.  He didn't really feel right selling it like a product, feeling it was some kind of gift from god, but eventually founded a 'society of the spirit' group and said that people who bought memberships in that, which had a wider goal, would be given the stuff free.

Unfortunately a couple things happened around then. The first was that a mysterious hole appeared in a 10,000 tank of toxic chemical at his AZ location and coincidentally the environmental authorities were right on that promptly with a cease and desist, seized all his materials, and gave him a monstrous size fine.  And, one of the very first on-deaths-bed patients, this an AIDS patient, who had died after taking the stuff--which you understand, she would have died anyway, she was profoundly bad off--her mother decided to sue the doctor and Hudson in a civil case which (a) she won, although the doctor is still practicing and swears that the material had nothing to do with her death, and it put another gigantic burden of debt on Hudson, and (b) the Arizona newspapers, one in particular, made an extra special effort to highlight Hudson as some kind of murderous fraud, who because he referred to its effect on consciousness was a 'new age guru', causing a really major tide of public sentiment against all of it.

Of course, now he had no money, no materials, no machinery, and no reputation--but still they got calls from people with terminal illness willing to try anything, who knew of someone who had been healed with it, daily.  But there was nothing they could do, basically.

Hudson said that since some transcripts of his public appearances were on the internet, that information about the process was now public.  That's about all he could do.

Meanwhile as far as the news and the campaign to destroy him was concerned, although he had named many people and labs along the way as having hired them or worked with them, basically most all of them on being contacted, knowing the conditions involved, would say, "Yes but we don't talk about our clients." or some other non-committal thing.  The PhD he paid over 100K to for a confirm analysis at one point issued a statement which supported him on one side then made a disclaimer on the other.  (He confirmed it was nothing known but then said he had never figured out what it was, or something like that.)  One lab, Argonne Natl Labs, said they didn't know of him, and so the newspaper demanded the name of whomever he'd worked with there, which he refused to give, suggesting that it wasn't his job to prove the science because anybody working at that level, following his notes made public even, could do it themselves.

He made a big deal sometime prior when he was lecturing about how in the US there is this chemical process where they do a 15 second burn and announce after that what a given chemical is.  The Russian Academy of Sciences or something like that, had a whole division for rare metals such as the platinums, and they said it required a 70 second burn I think it was (or 700? sorry I forget) to find certain things of this nature. They did tests and right up to like 69 seconds it would show as one kind of mineral but then when the heating continued, the reading would change drastically.  This was one of the things that led him to invest millions and every day of his life for years in the subject--because chemical analysis would say it was one thing, burn a bit longer and they'd say it was something else, and on and on, it was totally impossible.  Combined with the way that when dried in sunlight his material had a massive explosion yet not of mass--it was more like an explosion of intense light, which for example would burn partly through a pencil but would not even knock it over, that's the kind of thing that led to his search.

Anyway when following the Russian guidelines they finally resolved it.  So when he was essentially being destroyed, a similar soil sample was sent to an American lab which found of course the same results he did initially, and they also used this to sort of frame him as a fraud saying that scientifically his stuff was then disproven.  

The fact that he found several national level labs that had already come upon some degree of understanding this stuff themselves, or running into the perplexities that he was able to answer -- such as when designing fuel cells which only work with Rhodium -- is beside the point I guess.  Most of these sources are government contractors and the biggest money in the world. They are hardly going to be releasing that info to the public.

Many people now place David Hudson in the same category as people like Royal Rife, for example, who came up with a technology capable of curing people and the minute it became clear that it really worked, he was basically destroyed by a combination of sabotage and legal hassles.

So, the white powder of gold which he referred to, is not available through him.  Several product manufacturers claim to include "homeopathic portions" in their products, including the link up top of this thread, but Hudson early on disclaimed them as having anything of value.  He named several natural things that have a good portion of iridium and rhodium in them, although one would have to ingest a good quantity of the stuff to get results, including aloe vera mostly, blue-green algae, carrots grown in the southwest, sheer sorrel, slippery elm.  He did say that a firm called 'Emprise Corp' (he swore he had zero affiliation), their 'original injectable Acemannan' was 90% Rhodium although they actually themselves claimed it was glucopolysaccharide or something like that. He said "That will be in what they call their "Man Aloe" product, it has rhodium and iridium."

That's after reading everything unique I could find on the web about it including a dense 93 page collection of stuff, ergh.

PJ

PJ:
When I do a search, I find a company named Mannatech (ties into hudson's stuff, interesting) that owns the product Hudson named.  I don't know what happened to the other corp or if they changed their name.

From their financial report which was put online by a company that recruits investors (this firm is (MTEX) NASDAQ), I got:

The Company's principal executive offices are located at 600 S. Royal Lane, Suite 200, Coppell, Texas 75019, and the Company's telephone number is (972) 471-7400. They have another HQ in St. Leonards, Australia, a contract distribution center in Alberta/Calgary Canada and another distribution center in Botany, Australia.  

Unfortunately this corp uses only "Direct Marketing" to sell, which means the products aren't in stores, or health food food outlets, but are like Herbalife or something which you have to buy from someone personally selling it.  However it appears you can buy products from their home site:

http://www.mannatech.com/default.asp

However Man-Aloe and even the former Ambrose, both registered trademarked products and the first being what Hudson referred to, are no longer offered.  Other things are offered.  What relationship if any they have to Man-Aloe and how the ingredients compare, I have no idea.

PJ

PJ:
One of the better sites for legit reference I found on all this is here:

http://monatomic.earth.com

PJ:
But wait, there's more LOL.  ;D

OK, Carrington Laboratories makes no claims that their product contains monatomic anything. But they do have scientific research to backup the claims they do make about their product. Acemannan is a patented extract of beta-1,4-mannan mucilaginous polysaccharide from the aloe vera plant developed at Carrington Laboratories. According to David Hudson, Acemannan has a very high concentration (90%) of monatomic rhodium.

OK.  This product by Carrington is said to be carried in two products:

A product containing stablized beta-1,4-mannan called ManapolŪ (produced by Carrington Laboratories) is being marketed by Mannatech(tm).

Light Resources Unlimited is distributing a product called MPS-GOLD which contains the Carrington Laboratories substance as well.

OK, the LRU link didn't work, and I did a search, I find no company, I do find a letter from the FDA warning them about making claims that infringe on "medical" here:
http://www.fda.gov/CDER/warn/cyber/2002/CFSANlightresources.htm
but then I find it marketed on other websites related to a Dr. David Wheeler, and you can find the product description and ordering options here:
http://www.0disease.com/0dietary.html#Anchor-MPS-GOLD-6670

PJ

shr33m:
Quote


Where do we find that?



PJ,

The free ebook can be had at
http://members.optusnet.com.au/skyecn/all.pdf


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