• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Book Review: The Energy Cure by William Bengston, Ph.D.

#1
William Bengston, Ph.D., with Sylvia Fraser. 2010. The Energy Cure. Unraveling the Mystery of Hands-On Healing. Sounds True, Bolder CO. 288 pp.

A great alternative title to this book would have been, The Accidental Healer, for the pivotal event of this incredible story—how the author in a laboratory study cured five out of six mice injected with a strain of mammary cancer which previously had been 100% fatal—happened by accident when the man who was originally slated to act as the “healer” withdrew. In the spirit of “the show must go on,” Bengston—a newly minted college professor and friend of the cantankerous psychic and healer—stepped in and applied the hands-on healing technique he had helped his friend develop over the previous five years. When Bengston cured all of the experimental mice (the one which died did so of causes unrelated to the injected cancer), he was so shaken that he refused to participate in a follow-up study. It didn’t matter, though—Bengston taught the technique to the two college professors and two students who were to act as healers in the second study—and they healed seven out of the eight experimental mice in their study (with one mouse once again dying of causes unrelated to the injected cancer).

I first heard of Bengston when I read his article, Breakthrough: Clues to Healing with Intention in the second issue of Edge Science, the online, popularly-oriented magazine published by the Society of Scientific Exploration (see pp. 5 – 9 in http://www.scientificexploration.org/edgescience/edgescience_02.pdf ). Like anyone with a passing familiarity with popular culture, I had heard terms like “laying on of hands” and “therapeutic touch” for over a decade, but I was deeply skeptical of claims that living organisms could be cured of diseases by mental intention alone. However, a picture is worth a thousand words, and Bengston’s article in Edge Science is accompanied by clear color photographs of one of the experimental mice developing a huge tumor from the injected cancer cells. The last photograph shows the tumor ulcerating, a process which reminds me of when demolition experts “implode” large buildings. What appears to be doing the imploding in these cases is the animal’s immune system, and the ulcerated tumor turns black, then red, and finally white as it begins to shrink. The tumor continues to shrink and the animal’s fur regrows. Finally, one is left with a healed, healthy mouse with the appearance, size, and shape it started with.

The Energy Cure is one of the most fascinating books I have ever read. It tells the story of how Bengston met Bennett (Ben) Mayrick while working as a lifeguard at a neighborhood swimming pool following his graduation from college. Mayrick lived in the apartment complex where the swimming pool was located. Although Mayrick had a college education, he had a strong disdain for convention, and he preferred to work as a jack-of-all-trades. When Bengston met him he was working as a house cleaner. Bengston introduced himself to Mayrick after Bengston heard from a fellow lifeguard that Mayrick had psychic abilities. Mayrick told Bengston that he had found out quite by accident that he had psychic abilities when he attended a recent party. The people giving the party had brought in a psychic to provide entertainment. The psychic gave a demonstration in the phenomenon of psychometry—she collected personal items from the guests and then tried to perceive information about the guests by handling the items. After doing this with a number of the objects she selected Mayrick at random and had him try it. To the surprise of everyone—most of all himself—Mayrick gave very accurate readings.

In the months after he met Mayrick, Bengston informally tested Mayrick’s abilities. Mayrick performed psychometry readings for Bengston and for his own, and for Bengston’s, friends. Gradually Mayrick started experimenting and found that the handling of items wasn’t necessary—he could perceive information about people and events in a more active process (what we would call remote viewing, today).

Just as Mayrick discovered his psychic-informational abilities in a gradual manner, so he discovered his ability to heal. One day he, Bengston, and several friends were hanging out in Mayrick’s apartment. One of the friends gave Mayrick a letter from his cousin in Dallas, Texas, requesting a long-distance reading. As soon as he picked up the letter and tried to zero-in on the individual in Texas, Mayrick developed a terrific headache. Mayrick then put the letter down, and the headache disappeared. When Mayrick picked up the letter, again, the pain returned. Mayrick told Bengston and the others that he was going to make the headache “go away,” and he headed off to his bedroom where he lay down for about 15 minutes, holding the letter. He then returned to his friends, boasting, “I made the pain go away!”

The friend who was the cousin to the individual in Texas then phoned her. Everyone was astonished to hear that the cousin had been suffering a migraine at the time Mayrick began his reading. She then reported that her migraine had just mysteriously ended.

The next day Bengston prodded Mayrick to perform his first intentional healing. For years Bengston had been suffering from chronic lower back pain which first started when he was a competitive collegiate swimmer. On this particular day his back was hurting again. Remembering the incident with the letter from the previous day, Bengston asked Mayrick to try healing his back. Bengston bent over and had Mayrick place his hands on his back. Bengston felt an area about four inches in diameter grow warm, then hot. The area then grew numb. The numbness then disappeared, leaving his back pain-free. The effect was permanent—Bengston has never had problems with his back again.

Mayrick reported that during this process he felt “an energy pulsing down my arm.” He also told Bengston that this marked the beginning of a new phase of his life. Mayrick was going to become a professional healer.

Mayrick started off by treating friends and neighbors for minor complaints. He enjoyed early success, and his reputation spread by word-of-mouth. The number of people seeking help grew, and Mayrick slowly expanded the kinds of illnesses and conditions he would treat.

While all this was going on, Bengston moved on with his own life. He entered graduate school and earned his master's and doctoral degrees in sociology. He maintained his friendship with Mayrick, however, and even began trying his own hand at the healing process. Working alongside Mayrick he started to formalize the process, continually asking Mayrick how he did it—what was going on in his mind during the healing process, etc.

It was during this time that Bengston met David Krinsley, a geology professor from Queen’s College of the City University of New York City. Krinsley accompanied a friend who was seeking treatment for diabetes from Mayrick. Bengston and Krinsley became friends. They discovered they shared an interest in the scientific study of the paranormal. In discussing Mayrick they realized they both wanted Mayrick to move away from “the clinical model” to the “experimental model” utilizing animals whose genetics and environment could be controlled.

In the past, Krinsley had served as the interim provost at Queen’s College. Through this experience he had knowledge of the faculties and resources available at the school. He approached the chair of the biology department about performing a formal experiment to test Mayrick’s healing abilities. Though he wasn’t enthusiastic about it, the chairperson agreed.

They approached a professor in the department of biology to help them. They chose her because of her extensive experience in studying a particular form of mammary cancer in mice. She had been studying this particular cancer for over 20 years. She had a deep understanding of its biology and how it developed in the animal models she usually worked with.

The experiment was designed as follows. Twelve mice were to be injected with the mammary cancer cells. Six would then be given to Mayrick to treat, while the other six would stay with the associate professor as the controls. Unfortunately, there were several delays in the delivery of the mice, and Mayrick pulled out of the experiment. Over the preceding months his behavior had become increasingly erratic. He told Bengston that he interpreted the several delays in the delivery of the mice as a sign that he should not participate in the experiment.

This is how Bengston became the “accidental healer” I described at the beginning of this review. His friend David Krinsley persuaded him to act as the healer in Mayrick’s absence. Thus, for the next 30-plus days, Bengston spent an hour a day in a small storeroom where the experimental mice were kept. Bengston would sit on a stool, holding the small plastic cage containing the six mice. During this time he would practice the mental healing protocol he had developed with Mayrick over the proceeding years. This consisted of running a mental “film strip” through his mind containing images which represented the successful acquisition of desires on the part of the healer. These could be monetary, status, career, relationship, health or other kinds of goals. The purpose of this exercise was to occupy the conscious mind of the healer, letting the unconscious mind go about its healing duties.

No one knew what to expect during this experiment, and until the very end Bengston thought he was utterly failing to have an effect. About a week into the experiment, Bengston noticed lumps appearing in the coats of two of his mice. Soon, all of his mice developed these lumps. Bengston had Krinsley tell the biology professor, and she reported back that these were the beginning of the tumors which were characteristic of this particular cancer. The mice infected with this cancer invariably develop large external tumors which grow so large that they interfere with the functioning of their internal organs, killing them.

Bengston became horrified as the tumors grew larger and larger. He imagined that he was putting his mice through a painful ordeal, and he begged Krinsley to end the experiment and put the mice out of their misery.

Krinsley, however, wasn’t so certain. He pointed out that except for the presence of the tumors, the mice appeared to be healthy. They continued to scurry about their cage, and they even occasionally fought with each other. Krinsley became even more convinced to continue the experiment when he heard that two of the control mice had died from the cancer, and the rest were in such poor shape that they weren’t expected to live much longer.

Bengston, however, felt the experimental mice were getting worse. All of the tumors developed black spots which looked “like pencil points.” Krinsley urged him to keep going, pointing out that in all of the previous experiments, no mouse infected with this cancer had ever lived past 27 days. He suggested that if just one of the experimental mice lived to 28 days, it might be evidence of the healing having an effect in slowing down the cancer.

By days 17 to 21, some of the tumors had ulcerated. Basically, it appeared as though the tumors had imploded. Though Bengston thought this was obviously the beginning of the end, the behavior of his mice hadn’t changed—they were still “cavorting” about their cage as if nothing were wrong with them. This continued even after the ulcerations “grew large, raw, and red, as if holes had been burned into the mice.”

“By day 28 all five were still alive. I informed them aloud that they were making history.”

Bengston continued to be alarmed at the progression of the tumors. The ulcerations went from black to red to white. Bengston assumed that meant they were infected, but there was no pus or other discharge. As the days passed, Bengston started wondering if his eyes were deceiving him. Were the tumors shrinking? It certainly appeared so.

Bengston’s horror gradually changed to astonishment as the ulcerated tumors continued to shrink. Eventually, they disappeared completely, and the mice’s fur regrew. Finally, “my patients now looked the same as when we had begun—little brown creatures of normal shape and size.”

Krinsley and Bengston were so stunned they didn’t know what to think. Krinsley then took the mice to the biologist for analysis. The evening they were to receive her report, Bengston states that they “were pacing like expectant fathers.” Then the phone rang, and they received the miraculous news: the mice were cured. They were completely cancer free.

Both Bengston and Krinsley were so shaken that they spent the next several weeks apart without discussing the experiment, letting their emotions calm down. When they did meet to discuss the results, they both agreed that a top priority was to replicate the experiment. But, Bengston insisted upon a major change—he didn’t want to act as “healer” in the second experiment. He was too emotionally drained from the first one. In addition, he wanted to avoid any kind of self-delusion. Finally, he wanted to see if others besides Mayrick and himself could heal.

Krinsley protested loudly when Bengston suggested that he should act as healer in the second experiment. Bengston continued to pressure him, and eventually he relented, but only after Bengston agreed to have four healers—Krinsley and another healer of Krinsley’s choosing, and two healers of Bengston’s choosing.

Krinsley chose the head of the biology department at Queen’s College—the one who had been unenthusiastic about the first experiment. Bengston chose two graduate students, going through a selection process to find the most skeptical students available.

Over the next two weeks, Bengston met with the four to teach them his hands-on healing technique. Then, the experiment began. Each of the four healers was issued two experimental mice. Eight other mice would function as controls. The two graduate students treated their mice in an unused laboratory at the college, while Krinsley and the departmental chair treated their mice at their own locations.

This experiment progressed almost exactly like the first. One of the experimental mice died very early in the process of a cause unrelated to the cancer. The remaining seven developed tumors which grew then ulcerated, turning black then red and finally, white. The tumors then shrank and disappeared. Eventually the cancer remitted in all seven.

The first three-quarters of The Energy Cure is devoted to telling the story of how Bengston met Mayrick, their relationship developed, and how this led to the pivotal experiment in which Bengston cured the mice of cancer. The last quarter of the book begins to put these results in perspective. It tells how Bengston joined organizations such as the Society for Scientific Exploration and The International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies and Energy Medicine (ISSSEEM) where he met others conducting research in alternative healing, and the directions this is currently taking him. It includes several chapters in which Bengston presents his informed speculation as to the mechanism behind hands-on healing. There is a fascinating chapter in which Bengston presents a number of case studies of his healing of people suffering from a number of different ailments. In the next-to-last chapter, entitled Looking Back, Looking Forward, Bengston lists the things he thinks he has learned about hands-on healing and the questions he would like to pursue in the future. The last chapter, entitled Touching the Source, is a philosophical summation of the extraordinary journey Bengston has taken so far in exploring energy healing.

Had the book simply ended at this point, it would still be an incredible read, but the book includes an appendix which gives extremely detailed instructions on how to apply the Mayrick-Bengston hands-on healing method. This makes the book an invaluable resource.

I cannot recommend The Energy Cure highly enough. It combines a highly compelling personal story along with results from current research into the fascinating phenomenon of “energy healing.” The book is extremely well written and is very easy to read, thanks to co-writer Sylvia Fraser’s skillful shaping of the text. Perhaps the highest praise I can give The Energy Cure is to say the only other book I have ever read which so successfully merged a fascinating personal story with research results into an important “anomalous” phenomenon is Targ and Puthoff’s Mind-Reach.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
#2
What a wonderful review!

Results like this is why I now spend 5/6 of my PSI energy on things other than RV. While I didn't have a controlled experiment I did have great results. Our rabbit Oreo (Dutch Rabbit) was diagnosed with mammalian cancer. After my Kinder Side found she had lumps we immediately took her to the doctors, they said keep loving her and feeding her apples. We might have her a month yet six months would be an outright miracle, I immediately ordered an X-Light and a military grade Quantum 10 Chi energy lights to slow down the advancement. Interestingly enough coming back from the herbalist with Chinese herbs to slow the growth she drove my Cadillac under the back end of a truck. So when the lights arrived I got plenty of experience using the lights.

Almost immediately I recognized the energy coming from the lights and said I could duplicate that. So over the next six months I threw myself into learning and controlling this energy through the use of Reiki earning my Masters Attunement within six months. Probably because of the need and my latent abilities I was the best student she'd had up until that time.

The Better Half survived the ordeal with much last pain and trauma than expected. The rabbit passed on although she lasted 10 months leading some to believe she died of old age at 8 and 1/2. I credit Oreo with me learning the healing arts.

The fact that this story is about healing cancer makes it very remarkable because you must be very careful healing anyone or anything with cancer because the cancer feeds on the energy too. You can't just zap them and expect them to be fine, it takes serious effort.

I wanted to add that the energy transference is both recognizable and verifiable as I routinely used and EMF meter (normally used for ghost hunting) on both of them just to validate the energy transference, the needle was usually pegged.

Thanks for sharing this with us, I will very much consider adding this to my reading list.

Mycroft
 

Tunde

"Keep Moving Forward"
#3
Thanks for this. Very interesting indeed. Has this method been tested on humans ?
Working with mice is one thing doing it successfully with humans is another thing entirely having said that, there are some similarities to rv techniques such as the need to keep the conscious mind
Occupied, distracted or quiet to allow the subconscious to retrieve the target data.

"This is how Bengston became the “accidental healer” I described at the beginning of this review. His friend David Krinsley persuaded him to act as the healer in Mayrick’s absence. Thus, for the next 30-plus days, Bengston spent an hour a day in a small storeroom where the experimental mice were kept. Bengston would sit on a stool, holding the small plastic cage containing the six mice. During this time he would practice the mental healing protocol he had developed with Mayrick over the proceeding years. This consisted of running a mental “film strip” through his mind containing images which represented the successful acquisition of desires on the part of the healer. These could be monetary, status, career, relationship, health or other kinds of goals. The purpose of this exercise was to occupy the conscious mind of the healer, letting the unconscious mind go about its healing duties."

Tunde
 
#5
Has this method been tested on humans ?
Working with mice is one thing doing it successfully with humans is another thing entirely
Tunde:

To date there have been no controlled laboratory studies testing whether the Mayrick-Bengston hands-on healing method works on humans. As one can imagine, the level of risk goes up several orders of magnitude in testing humans as opposed to mice.

However, Mayrick and Bengston have successfully treated many dozens of individuals over the years outside of the laboratory. In the Introduction to The Energy Cure, Bengston writes:

Over the past thirty-five years I have successfully treated many types of cancer--bone, pancreatic, breast, brain, rectal, lymphatic, stomach, leukemia--as well as other diseases, all using a hands-on technique that is painless, noninvasive, and has no unpleasant side effects. To my knowledge, no person I have healed ever experienced a recurrence.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
#6
I'm surprised this discussion is still stuck in the dark ages.

There is quite a demand for Reiki healers in the US at hospitals and where the elderly are cared for. Nursing hospitals teach it here in the states, the Cleveland Clinic pays people to go to the rest homes to work on people. Virtually every Asian Indian I know, knows a practitioner.

Craniosacral Therapy, Polarity, Therapeutic Touch, Quantum Touch, Tachyon Therapy, Reconnection Therapy are pretty much all the same just pick one and go with it. Qi gong is good to but takes too much effort. This is just a sampling, after several thousand years of use I'm not about to wait for a funded laboratory study to toll me it is safe.

Mycroft
 
#7
I bought this book based on your review and I loved it. I would also recommend The Body Electric by Dr. Robert Becker. Also, the cycling method he does sounds like a variation of what Joe Mcmoneagle has been described to do when he RVs, that is to distract himself.
 

Tunde

"Keep Moving Forward"
#8
Banded_Krait said:
Has this method been tested on humans ?
Working with mice is one thing doing it successfully with humans is another thing entirely
Tunde:

To date there have been no controlled laboratory studies testing whether the Mayrick-Bengston hands-on healing method works on humans. As one can imagine, the level of risk goes up several orders of magnitude in testing humans as opposed to mice.

However, Mayrick and Bengston have successfully treated many dozens of individuals over the years outside of the laboratory. In the Introduction to The Energy Cure, Bengston writes:

Over the past thirty-five years I have successfully treated many types of cancer--bone, pancreatic, breast, brain, rectal, lymphatic, stomach, leukemia--as well as other diseases, all using a hands-on technique that is painless, noninvasive, and has no unpleasant side effects. To my knowledge, no person I have healed ever experienced a recurrence.
Thanks Banded,
I've ordered the book so looking forward
to reading it soon .

Tunde
 
#9
I've ordered the book so looking forward
to reading it soon .
I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. I think it is an important book.

http://bengstonresearch.com/videos/

By the way, William Bengston has created a Web site to discuss his research and his book. At the link, above, he has posted a couple of videos. I found the one at the bottom of the page to be very interesting. It is a video of a presentation he made at the annual meeting of the Society for Scientific Exploration in 2009. I enjoyed this video both because it further discusses his intriguing research, but also because it opens a window to Bengston the person. He has a pretty good sense of humor, for instance.
 

Tunde

"Keep Moving Forward"
#12
Well first of all a MASSIVE thank you to bandid for sharing this book review. I've only just started to
read the book and almost half way through. I wish someone would have told me about it earliear.
I lost my own mother to cancer last year as well as a close friend so many of the examples given
in this book I could relate to.

I have to agree with mjo this is probably the most fascinating book I have ever read. I thought
The PK Man by Jeffrey mishlove was awesome but this is something else entirely. Page after page
is just one mindbending revelation after another. If you are remotely interested in hands on healing or even remote healing and other PK related phenomenon then please buy this book and spread the word. Trust me you won't be able to put it down for a second :eek:

Tunde
 

Mycroft

Active Member
#13
Many thanks to the original poster, we're going to need more healers than we can find in the future.

Glad it is setting well with you Tunde, it is an exciting area to work in.

Mycroft
 
#15
Wow--this sounds really interesting. I'm going to have to order this book.
As I said in my original post, this is one of the most fascinating books I have ever read. As Tunde noted, on almost every page are these additional snippets of information which add to the wonderment and mystery of this phenomenon.

To me, one of the big questions arising from this book is whether the healing is due to an energy or an information transfer. I love the additional experiments Bengston has done in which he placed an electronic random number generator in the room while conducting these healings. While the healing is taking place, the degree of randomness drops by a statistically-significant degree. I think this is an important clue. There is a entirely new "industry" known as immuno-therapeutics in which companies are developing drugs and other therapies to get the human immune system to be better able to identify cancer cells as being foreign and to attack them. I wonder if that is what is going on with the Mayrick-Bengston healing method? It is like reverse-RVing: They are putting information into a system.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
#16
I can tell you with absolute certainty it is energy transfer.

I have tested with an EMF sensor immediately following a Reiki treatment. It absolutely pegged the EMF sensor.

Mycroft
 
#17
This is quite interesting...thanks BK et all.

I must admit that I have never given much thought to anomalous healing, but this certainly peaked my interest. I think there are several good techniques for use in other arenas as well, specifically the Image Cycling. I have had incredible, albeit very limited, success with this thus far.

Twenty years ago my mother was trained in Reiki. I thought she was an absolute nut case at the time. I was a believer, as Bengston suggests, in that I absolutely believed it would not work. She tried to use it on me a several times for various sports injuries, and each time I got very ill with a high fever. To this day, when I get sick, I say to my wife that my mother must have been doing Reiki on me.

Point of sharing this, I think Bengston's points on being a skeptic verses a believer (to either positive or negative side) is very much a key, which transcends other arenas as well. Not being invested in being right or wrong is important. This is a tricky one when applying ARV and money is on the line.

I also wanted to share that both Bengston's book Energy Cure, and his CD Hands-On-Healing are available from his website in digital download. You save a few bucks, and if your anything like me, not waiting for it to arrive is sweet.

http://www.soundstrue.com/shop/The-Energy-Cure/2653.productdetails

Also, for any Coast to Coast subscribers out there, here is a link to a show from August 12, 2010 with Bengston.

http://www.coasttocoastam.com/show/2010/08/12

Peace
 

Mycroft

Active Member
#18
My previous answer was the obvious answer, my better-half reminded me all entities also contain information whether they have weight or volume on this plane.

As far as treating people and animals with cancer the healer has to be very very careful which tissues are being treated and what kind of energy is being given, delivered, absorbed.

Mycroft
 
#19
--finally got around to ordering this book...had it on my list for months and now it's finally ordered and just waiting for the mail now.
 

PJ

Administrator
Staff member
#20
BK! Thanks for the ref, I'm excited about a cool new book. I'm determined to do more REAL READING this year. REAL meaning "not on a website" LOL. Sharp -- thanks for the online ref, I am SO impatient that's perfect.

tbone -- I read Becker's "The Body Electric" long ago; it's too bad but I haven't seen any further research even though IMO, given his comments there, he essentially proved the existence (albeit slight diffs in some locational details, at least for the subject under study) of the chinese "meridian" system as well as gave evidence to the concept that the body is very much an energetic construct (which someday down the road will probably explain, oh, "everything", including the oddities like spontaneous human combustion).

I did hands-on energy work for some time, many years ago, with a small group and a teacher I still have much respect for. This led to an apparent kundalini experience which led to all kinds of massive weirdness for a few years of my life, which was actually so bizarre it makes even the far boundaries of remote viewing seem laughably normal. Before that I'd been studying with an MD psych in psychoneuroimmunology which was an experimental approach to using hypnosis, trimodal biofeedback, dream therapy, and traditional or jungian therapy, to deal with both psychological and physical ailments. I miss the hands-on work terribly and I wish there was someone, anyone, in my physical locale I could find into that kind of thing. That's what I get for living in nowhere, Oklahoma!

I have an overview of everything from hands-on work, past-life regressions, hypnosis, etc. leading into remote viewing, in an article series linked here:
http://www.palyne.com/blog.redcairo/the-changing-role-of-a-student-reprise/
I think I will finally get around to finishing that series, this year, I'd forgotten about it entirely until I went looking for a link about the hands-on energy stuff. There is a mention in there of the sleep-inducing 'projection' effects the teacher could invoke at will, I always found that pretty interesting.

PJ