• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • Hi Viewers! As you see, we have new software for our forum. Updates will happen to make this a little more personalized to TKR eventually. :-) -- PJ

Separating signal from noise

#1
I've been trying to crack this since I started learning remote viewing four years ago and I don't feel I'm any closer to getting the answer. I watch the sessions published by Daz Smith and Dick Allgire and I'm absolutely amazed by their ability to stay on target and elaborate further and further without getting lost in imagination.
ufabet
I feel like there is a key mental technique that I'm missing, that once I "get it" I'll improve tremendously, but I can't figure it out for the life of me. Could anybody throw me a bone here? Hell, if Daz yourself would comment on this that would mean a lot to me!
 
#3
Ingo had a process where you learn the feeling of the signal by using a monitor who provides feedback. It may help. the problem with the approach is that signal feels a bit different from day to another one and from one target to another one probably because our bodies are not stable systems. meditation may help but i wouldnt say its more than a part of the solution
 
#4
Long ago I read some books on Chaos Theory and fractals. If I recall correctly one of the engineers (for Bell labs maybe?) was working on a solution to signal to noise ratios and he came up with the conclusion that you could only reduce noise so much. After noise was reduced to that point it became more effective to just resend the data multiple times than to try to reduce the noise further. It was something along those line as I recall. Maybe there is something in that story that can help. I haven't really thought about it much. Maybe doing multiple views and comparing the data?
 
#5
the thing is that your sessions are never simply signal / noise. it contains various types of data, some metaphoric, some literal. it depends on the target, you, and the relationship between those two.

certainly with experience, you can develop a sense of what large chunks of data are correct. On an item by item basis it may be bit more difficult. i would say not to worry too much about it. just view and let the process work itself out.